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Canada 2013 Glow in the Dark Prehistoric Creatures #2 - Quetzalcoatlus Dinosaur 25 Cents Crown-Size Colorized Quarter Specimen with Photoluminescent Technology

Price: $79.95 $39.95
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04024
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Product Description

Vibrant color and photoluminescent technology combine for two views of this prehistoric monster on this affordable, crown size dinosaur quarter!

Sold out at the Mint!Here's a new and exciting treasure that will just blow you away! Combining two proprietary technologies, color and the revolutionary photoluminescence, the Royal Canadian Mint ups the numismatic ante once more - the glow-in-the-dark effect is phenomenal! Certain to intrigue adults, delight youngsters, and send collectors into a frenzy, we can't recommend this inexpensive coin enough! With its extremely affordable price point and extremely desirable dinosaur theme, we believe this crown sized color quarter will be sought after for years to come!

Availability Notice - The first two Glow in the Dark Dinosaur coins (the Pachyrhinosaurus and the Quetzalcoatlus) sold out at the Mint seemingly in minutes, as we predicted. Please avail yourself of this unique opportunity to acquire one (or more) of this second in the series while you still can!

Photoluminescent Dinosaur Coins
Here are the Dinosaur Glow in the Dark Crown-Sized Color Quarters released so far:

    2012 Pachyrhinosaurus
    2013 Quetzalcoatlus
    2013 Tylosaurus

Click here for more coins featuring prehistoric dinosaurs!

Click here for all coins in the Glow-in-the-Dark Dinosaur series!

The huge, extinct, flying dinosaur Queztalcoatlus, found on the new, Canadian Glow in the Dark Color Quarter coin!Glow in the Dark Photoluminescence Technology
This new dinosaur coin features a new and patented technology from the Royal Canadian Mint, a special finish selectively applied to the dinosaur image. The RCM leads the world with its proprietary technologies, in which the finish is actually sealed on the coin. This photoluminescent technology makes the dinosaur fossil glow in the dark! The effect can be seen through the capsule and will not wear out. Sunlight is best, but fluorescent and incandescent lights (as found in most households) can also be used to activate the special photo-luminescent substance which makes the bones of the dinosaur glow. For best effect, expose the coin to one of these light sources for about a minute, then view in the dark to reveal the dino's skeleton.

Click here for more great Glow in the Dark coins!

Quetzalcoatlus - An Ancient Mystery!
Quetzalcoatlus was a pterodactyloid pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous of North America (Maastrichtian stage, about 68–65.5 million years ago), and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It was a member of the Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl.

The huge, extinct, flying dinosaur Queztalcoatlus, found on the new, Canadian Glow in the Dark Color Quarter coin! In the years since Quetzalcoatlus was first discovered in Texas in 1971, scientists have been unable to determine precisely how such a large dinosaur became airborne. Recent studies reveal that these animals walked on four legs and pushed with their forelimbs to launch into the air. Although small pterosaurs may have been active fliers, larger pterosaurs like Quetzalcoatlus probably soared, making use of thermal updrafts.

Experts have largely rejected early theories that Quetzalcoatlus skim-fed on fish or scavenged dinosaur carcasses because of problems presented by its physique. Instead, they believe that this animal, whose four legs resemble those of modern ungulates like deer, was adapted for terrestrial hunting and probably fed on small animals. Although Quetzalcoatlus would have been an impressive predator, it also fell prey to meat-eating dinosaurs, as indicated by a dromaeosaur tooth found embedded in pterosaur bone discovered in Dinosaur Provincial Park.

When it was first discovered, scientists estimated that the largest Quetzalcoatlus fossils came from an individual with a wingspan as large as 15.9 meters (52.2 feet), choosing the middle of three extrapolations from the proportions of other flying dinosaurs that gave an estimate of 11, 15.5 and 21 meters respectively (36 feet, 50.85 feet, 68.9 feet). In 1981, further study lowered these estimates to 11–12 meters (36–39 feet). More recent estimates based on greater knowledge of azhdarchid proportions place its wingspan at 10–11 meters (33–36 ft).

Click here for more coins featuring prehistoric dinosaurs!

The huge, extinct, flying dinosaur Queztalcoatlus, found on the new, Canadian Glow in the Dark Color Quarter coin! The Quetzalcoatalus Photoluminescent Crown-Size Color Quarter is the second entry in the new and extremely popular Glow-in-the-Dark Prehistoric Creatures Series. The program is scheduled to have four entries:

    2012 Pachyrhinosaurus
    2013 Quetzalcoatlus
    2013 Tylosaurus
    Prehistoric Creature #4

Click here for all coins in the Glow-in-the-Dark Prehistoric Creatures series!

Technology Note
This Photoluminescent Crown-Size Color Quarter features the Royal Canadian Mint’s patented colorization technology. The RCM leads the world with its proprietary colorization technology, in which the color is actually sealed on the coin. The intricate detail, smooth gradients, and extreme precision of the technology create a stunning, full-color portrait on each coin.

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The Specimen Finish
This coin features the uniquely-Canadian "specimen" finish, a three-fold combination of different finishes. The design (raised area or relief) includes both frosted and mirrored surfaces, while the fields (background) are subtly striated, resulting in a contrasting, matte appearance. No other mint in the world employs the specimen finish.

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Glow In The Dark Dinosaur Quarter in Package
Obverse
By day, a full color depiction of the dinosaur Quetzalcoatalus. In the dark, a photoluminescent depiction of its armored and horned skeleton. This design has been approved by the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology, and is highlighted in an unique patina by the Royal Canadian Mint's proprietary color and glow-in-the-dark technologies. The date of issue and denomination are both indicated.

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Reverse
Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II of England, in profile facing right. This portrait, the fourth effigy of the queen to appear on Canadian Coinage, was executed by the artist Susanna Blunt. The legend ELIZABETH II D. G. REGINA ("Elizabeth II, Queen by the Grace of God") also appears.

Click here for the large and colorful crown-size Canadian quarters!

Packaging
The coin is encapsulated inside a burgundy leatherette, clamshell-style presentation case, lined with black velvet and protected by a custom, full-color outer sleeve with glow in the dark elements! An individually-numbered certificate of authenticity is included.

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Specifications
The huge, extinct, flying dinosaur Queztalcoatlus, found on the new, Canadian Glow in the Dark Color Quarter coin!
Country Canada
Year of Issue 2013
   
Face Value 25 Cents
Weight 12.61 g
Diameter 35 mm
Mintage Limit    30,000
   
Finish Specimen with Color
Composition Copper Nickel
Edge Plain
   
Artist Julius T. Csotonyi
Certificate Individually Numbered

Complete Certificate Text

Lord of the Skies: Quetzalcoatlus— North America’s Largest Pterosaur

More than 66 million years ago, a shallow inland sea known as the Western Interior Seaway covered the centre of the North American continent, stretching from the Arctic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. The eastern and western shores of this sea were lined with plains that gave way to hilly highlands in the East and the volcanic beginnings of the Rocky Mountains in the West.

Across much of the ancient shoreline soared one of the largest animals ever to take to the air: Quetzalcoatlus. This pterosaur from the Late Cretaceous period was a large, lightweight reptile with a long, stiff neck, a sharp bill, and a wingspan of up to 10 metres (33 feet).

This pterosaur was first unearthed in 1971 at Big Bend National Park in Texas and was named after Quetzalcoatl, an ancient feathered snake deity worshipped by the Aztec people. Additional specimens of smaller animals with wingspans of approximately 5 metres were later discovered and believed to represent a smaller species of Quetzalcoatlus.

Quetzalcoatlus is a member of the azhdarchid family: toothless pterosaurs that have been found around the world, leading some experts to suggest that azhdarchids crossed oceans to migrate between continents.
A Canadian Quetzalcoatlus?

Because pterosaur bones are hollow, thin-walled, and fragile, complete skeletons of pterosaurs are rare. Fragmentary bones are usually all that remain of these animals - and such is the case for the fossil record of pterosaurs in Canada. The most abundant pterosaur material found on Canadian soil are bones discovered in Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta. These isolated bones from several animals demonstrate that azhdarchids with a wingspan of up to 10 meters flew in the Canadian skies 75 million years ago. Because the bones are too incomplete to allow precise identification, but are similar to those found in Texas, the Canadian pterosaurs are believed to represent a species of Quetzalcoatlus.

An Ongoing Puzzle: How Did Quetzalcoatlus Live?

In the years since these first exciting discoveries of Quetzalcoatlus, scientists have been unable to determine precisely how such a large creature became airborne. Recent studies reveal that these animals walked on four legs and pushed with their forelimbs to launch into the air. Although small pterosaurs may have been active flyers, larger pterosaurs like Quetzalcoatlus probably soared, making use of thermal updrafts.

Experts have largely rejected early theories that Quetzalcoatlus skim-fed on fish or scavenged dinosaur carcasses because of problems presented by its physique. Instead, they believe that this animal, whose four legs resemble those of modern ungulates like deer, was adapted for terrestrial hunting and probably fed on small animals. Although Quetzalcoatlus would have been an impressive predator, it also fell prey to meat-eating dinosaurs, as indicated by a dromaeosaur tooth found embedded in pterosaur bone discovered in Dinosaur Provincial Park.

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