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Canada 2014 Canadian Dinosaurs #2 - Scutellosaurus Armored Dinosaur $20 Pure Silver Proof

Price: $129.95 $79.95
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05101
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Product Description

This low-mintage, meticulously detailed and engraved one troy ounce, pure silver proof depicts the mysterious and armored dinosaur Scutellosaurus!

The extremely popular Canadian Dinosaurs program continues with the armored dinosaur Scutellosaurus! The design image by Canadian artist Julius Csotonyi features an interpretation of what this mysterious reptile may have looked like. The scientific accuracy of the depiction was verified by palaeontologists of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology. A limited mintage of just 8,500 and a highly popular subject matter (dinosaurs!), combined with exceptional design and traditional engraving, mean that this beauty is sure to be a favorite among coin collectors, archaeologists, palaeontologists and dinosaur fans alike! Fearsome reptiles released so in the Canadian Dinosaurs program include:

    1)  Bathygnathus Sailed-Finned Dinosaur
    2)  Scutellosaurus Armored Dinosaur
    3)  Xenoceratops Horned Dinosaur
    4)  Albertosaurus Carnivorous Tyrannosaur

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Click here for all coins in the Canadian Dinosaurs program!

The extinct, heavily armored dinosaur Scutellosaurus.Viewed from its front left side, Scutellosaurus presents rows of hundreds of armored “scutes” or bony plates that cover the entire upper portion of its body, from its neck to the tip of its exceptionally long tail. Its narrow head turns toward the viewer. Its short but muscular forelimbs suggest that it was bipedal only part of the time, at other times resting or walking on all fours. Long, lithe hind limbs end in large three-toed claws while its long narrow tail (possibly used as a counterweight to its heavily armored body as well as a counterbalance for feeding and moving on its hind feet) unfurls into the background in a graceful curve. The scientific name SCUTELLOSAURUS is sunk into the coin, an example of an incuse legend.

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The Mysterious Case of the Nova Scotian Ornithischian Scutellosaurus
Though the current North American landscape is geologically recent, the continent has teemed with life for hundreds of millions of years. Clues to the life story of our land and the creatures that once lived here lie encased in rock and earth. Solving the mystery of how they lived and died has captivated American researchers for over a century!

Fossils of dinosaurs are surprisingly uncommon, and complete specimens are extremely rare; thus, palaeontologists often need to gather knowledge from many other scientific disciplines to understand the evidence they uncover. Palaeontologists carefully study and interpret findings to arrive at a well integrated hypothesis of what the lifestyle of a fossilized creature could have been. Technology offers help in documenting and dating fossils, but palaeontologists’ most important tools are meticulous research, creativity, logic and patience.

Translated as “little shield lizard,” Scutellosaurus was named by American palaeontologist Edwin H. Colbert in 1981. The Early Jurassic herbivore reached over four feet (1.2 meteres) in length, had an extremely long tail, and was covered by hundreds of small pieces of bony armor (called scutes) along its neck, back, and tail. Its forelimbs and hands were relatively long, suggesting that it was probably able to alternate between a bipedal and quadrupedal stance. Unlike more advanced ornithischians, the teeth of Scutellosaurus were positioned near the edge of the jaws, indicating that it lacked well-developed cheeks to keep food in its mouth while chewing. Based on its bony armor and other characteristics of its skeleton, it is believed that Scutellosaurus may have been an early ancestor of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs – the armored dinosaurs.

Click here for all coins in the related Dinosaur Fossils program!

Purity Note
Dinosaur In-Box The Royal Canadian Mint refines the purest silver in the world. The RCM is also the only mint in the world to issue commemorative coins in a .9999 fineness. This one ounce silver proof is 99.99% pure!


Obverse
A depiction of the armored dinosaur Scutellosaurus, by artist Julius Csotonyi. This design has been approved by the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology. The scientific name SCUTELLOSAURUS is sunk into the coin, an example of an incuse legend. The date of issue and denomination are both indicated.

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Reverse
Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, in profile facing right. This portrait, the fourth effigy of the queen to appear on Canadian Coinage, was executed by the artist Susanna Blunt. The legend ELIZABETH II D. G. REGINA ("Elizabeth II, Queen by the Grace of God") also appears.

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Packaging
The coin is encapsulated inside a burgundy leatherette, clamshell-style presentation case, lined with black velvet and protected by an outer sleeve. An individually-numbered certificate of authenticity is included.

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Specifications
Country Canada
Year of Issue 2014
   
Face Value 20 Dollars
Weight 31.39 g
Diameter 38 mm
Mintage Limit       8,500
   
Finish Proof
Composition .9999 Fine (Pure) Silver
Edge Serrated (milled, reeded)
   
Artist Julius Csotonyi
Certificate Individually Numbered

Complete Certificate Text

The Mysterious Case of the Nova Scotian Ornithischian

Though the current Canadian landscape is geologically recent, the North American landmass has teemed with life for hundreds of millions of years. Clues to the life story of our land and the creatures that once lived here lie encased in rock and earth. Solving the mystery of how they lived and died has captivated American researchers and laypeople for over a century.

Fossils are surprisingly uncommon, and complete specimens are extremely rare; thus, palaeontologists often need to gather knowledge from many other scientific disciplines to understand the evidence they uncover. Palaeontologists carefully study and interpret findings to arrive at a well integrated hypothesis of what the lifestyle of a fossilized creature could have been. Technology offers help in documenting and dating fossils, but palaeontologists’ most important tools are meticulous research, creativity, logic and patience.

Click here for coins and medals featuring dinosaurs!

Nova Scotia’s Bay of Fundy region is famous for preserving rocks of Late Triassic and Early Jurassic age–the dawn of the Age of the Dinosaurs. Although footprints left by dinosaurs are commonly preserved there, fossil bones are extremely rare and generally fragmentary. Among these specimens are isolated teeth providing strong evidence for the presence of a small bipedal ornithischian dinosaur during the Early Jurassic. Because the teeth of all known primitive herbivorous, “bird-hipped” dinosaurs look very similar, it is difficult to identify the exact species, or reconstruct what the animal looked like, based on teeth alone. However, similar-aged fossils found elsewhere in the world can shed light on the identity of the Nova Scotian ornithischian.

Very few Early Jurassic ornithischians are known around the world, the best-known being Lesothosaurus from South Africa and Scutellosaurus from Arizona. Because Scutellosaurus is the only small ornithischian known from the Early Jurassic of North America, palaeontologists can hypothesize that the Nova Scotia teeth may have belonged to Scutellosaurus. However, they must remain open to the possibility that the teeth could be from a different animal. Since all of the continents were still connected during the Early Jurassic, dinosaurs were free to roam and it is possible that animal species from Africa could also have been present on the landmass that now forms Nova Scotia.

Click here for all coins in the Canadian Dinosaurs program!

Translated as “little shield lizard,” Scutellosaurus was named by American palaeontologist Edwin H. Colbert in 1981. The Early Jurassic herbivore reached 1.2 m in length, had an extremely long tail, and was covered by hundreds of small pieces of bony armor (called scutes) along its neck, back, and tail. Its forelimbs and hands were relatively long, suggesting that it was probably able to alternate between a bipedal and quadrupedal stance. Unlike more advanced ornithischians, the teeth of Scutellosaurus were positioned near the edge of the jaws, indicating that it lacked well-developed cheeks to keep food in its mouth while chewing. Based on its bony armor and other characteristics of its skeleton, it is believed that Scutellosaurus may have been an early ancestor of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs – the armored dinosaurs.

Click here for all coins in the related Dinosaur Fossils program!

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