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Canada 2016 Mother Polar Bear and Cub on Iceberg under Northern Lights Arctic Ice Floe Aurora Borealis $20 Pure Silver Proof Masters Club Exclusive Special Edition with Translucent Blue Enamel

Price: $129.95 $79.95
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07117
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Product Description

Get this ultimate polar bear coin - a mother bear and her cub on an iceberg, beneath the Northern Lights, highlighted in beautiful, translucent blue enamel on this one troy ounce, pure silver proof, with a tiny mintage of just 4,000!

Sold out at the Mint!An immense polar bear and her endearing little cub float across iceberg-filled Arctic waters under a sky lit by the aurora borealis: icons within icons, each elemental to the high northern latitudes. Showcasing the both artistic talent and the technological achievement of the Royal Canadian Mint using its luxurious translucent blue enamel, this rare, pure silver proof celebrates the beloved polar bear.

Investment Notes
    - This coin sold out on pre-release!
    - Extremely low mintage limit of just 4,000!
    - Charming vignette of a mother polar bear and her cub under the Northern Lights!
    - Translucent blue enamel lends depth and color to the Arctic ocean, iceberg, and sea ice floe!

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Canada 2016 Mother Polar Bear and Cub on Iceberg Arctic Ice Floe $20 Pure Silver Proof Masters Club Exclusive Special Edition with Translucent Blue EnamelAn Original Work of Art
The design by Canadian artist Julius Csotonyi is centered around a charming portrait of a mother polar bear and her tiny cub. The cub leans in against the mother’s front leg, looking directly at the viewer as the mother gazes towards the right. The two bears stand on a small iceberg, floating amid other larger bergs in open water. Above them, the aurora borealis illuminates a starlit sky. The bottom half of the image presents an underwater view of this scene, with a school of Arctic cod swimming near the submerged section of the polar bears’ iceberg. The underwater portion of the image is overlaid with translucent blue enamel, lending depth and color to the coin’s highly detailed engraving and proof finish shadings.

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The Quintessentially Canadian (and American!) Polar Bear
For many North Americans, the profile of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is as recognizably Canadian as the shape of a maple leaf or the silhouette of a Canada goose. Canada’s polar bears comprise more than half of the entire world's population, since they live primarily in the coastal regions of the Arctic, depending upon sea ice to hunt the ringed seal. The polar bear’s adaptations to its carnivorous lifestyle in the frozen north include a thick layer of subcutaneous fat, dense water-repellent fur the color of snow, fur on the bottoms of its paws for traction and warmth, sharp claws, and an elongated body and huge forepaws that make polar bears great swimmers.

The polar bear is the largest terrestrial carnivore in the world. It is threatened by hunting, polution, habitat loss and global warming.As of 2008, the World Conservation Union (IUCN) reports that the global population of polar bears is only 20,000 to 25,000, and is declining. In 2006, the IUCN upgraded the polar bear from a species of least concern to a vulnerable species. It cited a "suspected population reduction of great than 30% within three generations (45 years)", due primarily to global warming. Other risks to the polar bear include pollution in the form of toxic contaminants, conflicts with shipping, stresses from recreational polar-bear watching, and oil and gas exploration and development. The IUCN also cited a "potential risk of over-harvest" through legal and illegal hunting.

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Please see the articles lower in this presentation for a more detailed natural history of the proud polar bear!

The polar bear is the largest terrestrial carnivore in the world. It is threatened by hunting, polution, habitat loss and global warming.Technology Note - Enamel
The vibrant blue of the Arctic ocean and underwater portion of the iceberg features the Royal Canadian Mint’s patented enamel technology. This proprietary technique applies deep, rich, semi-opaque colors to the coin, while the glaze over these hues enhances the effect of real enamel.

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Technology Note - Purity
The Royal Canadian Mint refines the purest silver in the world. The RCM is also the only mint in the world to issue commemorative coins in a .9999 fineness. This one troy ounce silver coin is 99.99% pure!

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Canada 2016 Polar Bear $20 EnamelObverse
The design by Canadian artist Julius Csotonyi is centered around a charming portrait of a mother polar bear and her tiny cub, standing on an ice flow. The underwater portion of the image is overlaid with translucent blue enamel, lending depth and color to the coin’s highly detailed engraving and proof finish shadings. The date and denomination are also indicated.

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Reverse

Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, in profile facing right. This portrait, the fourth effigy of the queen to appear on Canadian coinage, was executed by the artist Susanna Blunt. The legend ELIZABETH II D. G. REGINA ("Elizabeth II, Queen by the Grace of God") also appears.

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Packaging
The coin is encapsulated inside a burgundy leatherette, clamshell-style presentation case, lined with black velvet and protected by a full color outer box. An individually-numbered certificate of authenticity is included.

SpecificationsThe polar bear is the largest terrestrial carnivore in the world. It is threatened by hunting, polution, habitat loss and global warming.
Country Canada
Year of Issue 2016
   
Face Value 20 Dollars
Weight 31.39 g
Diameter 38.00 mm
Mintage Limit     4,000
   
Finish Proof with Colored Enamel
Composition .9999 Fine (Pure) Silver
Edge Reeded (milled, serrated)
   
Artist Julius Csotonyi
Certificate Individually Numbered

The Largest Terrestrial Carnivore - Endangered
The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is a bear native largely within the Arctic circle encompassing the Arctic Ocean, its surrounding seas and surrounding land masses. It is the world's largest land carnivore and also the largest bear (together with the omnivorous Kodiak bear, which is approximately the same size). An adult male weighs between 770 and 1,500 pounds (350–680 kg), while an adult female is about half that size. Although it is closely related to the brown bear, the polar bear has evolved to occupy a narrow ecological niche, with many body characteristics adapted for cold temperatures, for moving across snow, ice, and open water, and for hunting the seals which make up most of its diet. Although most polar bears are born on land, they spend most of their time at sea (hence their scientific name meaning "maritime bear") and can hunt consistently only from sea ice, so they spend much of the year on the frozen sea.

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The polar bear is the largest terrestrial carnivore in the world. It is threatened by hunting, polution, habitat loss and global warming. As of 2008, the World Conservation Union (IUCN) reports that the global population of polar bears is only 20,000 to 25,000, and is declining. In 2006, the IUCN upgraded the polar bear from a species of least concern to a vulnerable species. It cited a "suspected population reduction of great than 30% within three generations (45 years)", due primarily to global warming. Other risks to the polar bear include pollution in the form of toxic contaminants, conflicts with shipping, stresses from recreational polar-bear watching, and oil and gas exploration and development. The IUCN also cited a "potential risk of over-harvest" through legal and illegal hunting.

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A little good news - on 15 May 2008, the United States listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act and banned all importing of polar bear trophies. Importing products made from polar bears had been prohibited from 1972 to 1994 under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and restricted between 1994 and 2008. Under those restrictions, permits from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service were required to import sport-hunted polar bear trophies taken in hunting expeditions in Canada. The permit process required that the bear be taken from an area with quotas based on sound management principles. Since 1994, more than 800 sport-hunted polar bear trophies have been imported into the U.S.

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Unfortunately, Canada has not followed suite with a hunting ban. The territory of Nunavut accounts for 80% of Canadian kills. In 2005, the government of Nunavut increased the quota from 400 to 518 bears, despite protests from some scientific groups. In two areas where harvest levels have been increased based on increased sightings, science-based studies have indicated declining populations, and a third area is considered data-deficient. While most of that quota is hunted by the indigenous Inuit people, a growing share is sold to recreational hunters (0.8% in the 1970s, 7.1% in the 1980s, and 14.6% in the 1990s). The Government of the Northwest Territories maintain their own quota of 72–103 bears within the Inuvialuit communities of which some are set aside for sports hunters.

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