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Canada 2016 World War II Battlefront Series #2 - Battle of Hong Kong - Heroic Defense Against the Japanese and King George VI Second World War $20 Pure Silver Proof L10

Price: $109.95 $64.95
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07732
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Product Description

Get this second release in this popular military series - World War II Battlefront! Canadian soldiers heroically defend against the Japanese onslaught during the Battle of Hong Kong on December 7, 1941 (the same day as the attack on Pearl Harbor) on this pure silver, military proof!

In commemoration of the 75th anniversary of Second World War, Talisman Coins is proud to bring you the military-themed World War II Battlefront Series! Each one troy ounce, pure silver proof coin highlights a specific battle during the years 1939 to 1945, when the entire globe was locked in the mortal struggle of freedom versus tyranny. The reverse of each coin replicates the original portrait of King George VI, the wartime monarch during World War II, as found on found on Canadian coinage of the era.

    #1 - Battle of Britain, 1940
    #2 - Battle of Hong Kong, 1941
    #3 - Raid on Dieppe, 1942

Click here for all coins in the World War II Battlefront Series!

Battle of Hong Kong Outer BoxThe second coin in the WWII Battlefront Series depicts the Battle of Hong Kong, which began on the same day as the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. Outnumbered and more poorly equipped than their enemy, the odds were not in the Canadians’ favor on December 8th, 1941, as they fought valiantly to defend the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong until the very end. On the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Hong Kong, this one troy ounce pure silver proof pays tribute to the bravery and resolve of those courageous Canadian soldiers, whose sacrifices remind us of the tragic cost of war.

Please see the article below the blue Specifications box lower in this listing for more details about the heroic defense of Hong Kong in December, 1941.

Click here for all coins and sets commemorating the Second World War!

An Original Work of Military Art
The meticulously detailed design by Canadian artist Joel Kimmel captures the intensity of the fight and the sheer bravery of Canadian soldiers during the Battle of Hong Kong during World War II (December 8 through 25, 1941). Amidst the jungle conditions and rugged terrain of Hong Kong Island, two Canadian soldiers are among the Allied forces that formed a line of defense to counter the Japanese advance toward the Wong Nai Chung Gap. The infantryman in the foreground is dressed in the shorts and short sleeves of the Pacific uniform. Rushing toward the enemy with resolve and courage, he makes his way past a ruined concrete pillbox that bears witness of the withering Japanese artillery fire. Behind him, a soldier advances up the sloped ridge overlooking the bay and aims his Lee Enfield rifle with bayonet. The all-out Japanese assault was backed by strong aerial attacks, as demonstrated by the Mitsubishi Zero Sen fighter falling from the sky with flames and smoke rising up from its nose. The overwhelming nature of the Japanese attack is also seen in the ships that fill the bay between the island and the mountainous mainland in the background.

Please see the article below the blue Specifications box lower in this listing for more details about the heroic defense of Hong Kong in December, 1941.

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Technology Note - Purity
The Royal Canadian Mint refines the purest silver in the world. The RCM is also the only mint in the world to issue commemorative coins in a .9999 fineness. This one troy ounce silver coin is 99.99% pure!

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Obverse

Canada 2016 WWII Battlefront - Battle of Hong Kong Silver in BoxThe meticulously detailed design by Canadian artist Joel Kimmel captures the intensity of the fight and the sheer bravery of Canadian soldiers during the Battle of Hong Kong during World War II (December 8 through 25, 1941). The date and denomination are also indicated.

Click here for all coins in the World War II Battlefront Series!

Reverse
Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, in profile facing right. This portrait, the fourth effigy of the queen to appear on Canadian Coinage, was executed by the artist Susanna Blunt. The legend ELIZABETH II D. G. REGINA ("Elizabeth II, Queen by the Grace of God") also appears.

Click here for all coins and sets commemorating the Second World War!


Packaging
The coin is encapsulated inside a burgundy leatherette, clamshell-style presentation case, lined with black velvet and protected by a fully illustrated outer box. An individually-numbered certificate of authenticity is included.

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Specifications

Country Canada
Year of Issue 2016
   
Face Value 20 Dollars
Weight 31.39 g
Diameter 38 mm
Mintage Limit      10,000
   
Finish Proof
Composition .9999 Fine (Pure) Silver
Edge Reeded (milled, serrated)
   
Artist Joel Kimmel
Certificate Individually Numbered

The Heroic Defense of Hong Kong - December, 1941
Canada's first land combat of the Second World War began on December 8, 1941, when, mere hours after the bombing on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese launched an invasion on the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong. Outnumbered and more poorly equipped than their enemy, the odds were not in the Canadians' favor as they defended first peninsula, then the island itself. Over 550 of the 1,975 Canadians stationed in Hong Kong never made it back home, but during the 17 days of fierce fighting, they fought valiantly, engaging in hand-to-hand combat with the enemy, as they defended Hong Kong to the very end.

The Japanese invasion was launched just eight hours after the December 7th attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, yet the Battle of Hong Kong is recorded as having begun on December 8th. Why? This is due to the International Date Line, which means Hong Kong and Hawaii are separated by an 18-hour time difference - at least on the clock.

Besides infantry, Canada's force in Hong Kong also included two medical officers, three chaplains, two Auxiliary Service Officers, two Nursing Sisters, two officers of the Canadian Dental Corps and their assistants, plus a detachment of the Canadian Postal Corps. Their heavier equipment (that is, the vast majority of the 212 of the vehicles assigned to the Canadian forces in Hong Kong) would never arrive. On board the freighter Don Jose, the vehicles made it as far as Manila before the Japanese sneaks attacks; they were then requisitioned by U.S. forces and diverted to assist in the defense of the Philippines.

Among the many casualties was the first Second World War Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross, who selflessly threw himself on a grenade to save his fellow soldiers of the Winnipeg Grenadiers' “A” Company. A Newfoundland dog named Gander was also posthumously awarded for his sacrifice, by picking up a grenade and rushing toward the enemy. His name is among those on the Hong Kong Veterans Memorial Wall in Ottawa.

The Japanese invasion of Hong Kong began on the morning of December 8, 1941, when aircraft attacked the Kai Tak airport before targeting the Sham Shui Po, where two men of the Royal Canadian Signals became the first Canadian casualties in Hong Kong. On the ground, the large enemy force fought hard to reach the high ground as they pushed south along the mountainous mainland toward the Gin Drinkers' Line, a defensive line dotted with pillboxes and trenches to defend the Kowloon Peninsula and Victoria Harbour. By the evening of December 13, the mainland was lost, and a captured soldier became the first Canadian infantryman killed in the Second World War.

Refusing to surrender, the Allied forces regrouped on Hong Kong Island where they were split into two defending forces: an East Brigade (including the Royal Rifles of Canada) and a West Brigade (with the Winnipeg Grenadiers). The enemy launched its amphibious assault on the island on December 18 before pushing toward its center and the Wong Nai Chung Gap, effectively severing the defense in half.

There was no relief in sight for the beleaguered troops. In the east, the Royal Rifles succeeded in driving out the enemy from several hill positions, but soon found themselves running short om ammunition, food and water. In the west, “A” Company of the Grenadiers was surrounded and captured. Commander Lawson himself became a casualty when, his headquarters surrounded, he exited the building with a pistol in each hand and went down fighting.

For three days, “D” Company of the Grenadiers fought off enemy attacks until their door was eventually blown down; inside, the Japanese were shocked to find just 37 wounded Grenadiers, fighting until they had nothing left. The Allies' inevitable surrender came on December 25, a day that became known as “Black Christmas.”

For their part, the Canadians had shown incredible resilience as they held their own against a much larger, better trained, and better equipped enemy force that had both overwhelming artillery fire and total air superiority. Canadian casualties initially numbered 290 killed and 493 wounded, but many more would endure unspeakable suffering, hardship and death as Prisoners of War (POWs). The soldiers of the Canadian contingent at the Defense of Hong Kong are forever remembered for their perseverance, courage and sacrifice, earning them a place of honor in the annals of Canadian military history.

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