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Canada 2017 Locomotives Across Canada #2 - 1949 RS 20 Diesel Electric RS2 Road Switcher RS-2 Locomotive Train Engine $20 Pure Silver Proof with 24-Karat Gold-Plating L07

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08048
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Product Description

Celebrate the spirit that built a nation from sea to sea with Canada's most famous locomotive railroad train railway engines, enhanced with 24-karat gold plating on this one troy ounce, pure silver proof coin!

On May 10, 1869, at Promontory Summit, Utah, the United States' first Transcontinental Railroad was officially completed with the driving of the Golden Spike, joining the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railways. Even more important to the formation of its nation was the completion of Canada's first Transcontinental Railroad, which for decades was literally the only true coast-to-coast link across the great country. The old axiom, "Canada built the railroad, then the railroad built Canada" is certainly true. Indeed, the formation of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) is usually cited as the second most important single event in the formation of Canada as a nation, second only to the establishment of the Dominion of Canada itself (Confederation) by the British North America Act of 1867!

Countess of Dufferin Baldwin 4-4-0 Steam LocomotiveLike modern engines of change, Canada’s locomotives have been instrumental in shaping the nation throughout its 150 years of history. The Locomotives Across Canada seriesspeaks of a nation coming into its own through some of its most famous train engines - including the RS-2, which marked the end of the golden age of steam locomotives, and the introduction of a new technology that continues to power today’s trains: the diesel-electric locomotive.

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An Exciting, Popular Railroad Program!
Explore Canada’s history through its most famous locomotives! The one full troy ounce, pure silver proof coins in the Locomotives Across Canada series salute three of the most famous train engines! Even the smallest details shine in each meticulous design, thanks to a keen attention to historical accuracy, precision engraving, and the use of multiple finishes that add subtle contrasts.

In the heart of the northern boreal pine forest, a locomotive engine pulls a railroad train of boxcars and passenger cars over a railway bridge, as pine trees go by. Topping this off, the selective application of 24-karat gold plating shines the spotlight on the locomotive itself! As an added bonus, the complete edge and full rim on each side, as well as the portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, are all likewise plated in pure gold, to ensure an elegance that makes this a truly exceptional keepsake!

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Locomotives Across Canada Program
Locomotive engines featured in the Locomotives Across Canada program will include:

    4-4-0 Locomotive
    RS-2 Diesel-Electric Locomotive
    GE ES44AC Locomotive

    + 4-4-0 Locomotive in 3-Coin Custom Metal Presentation Case Tin

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Canadian Pacific Railway CPR D-10 Locomotive Railroad Train Engine 1352.jpgAn Original Work of Art!
The design by Canadian artist John Mantha looks back at the first wave of diesel-electric locomotives that were introduced in Canada in the 1940s and 1950s. Used by the Roberval and Saguenay Railway, the RS 20 was the first diesel road locomotive manufactured in Canada, built in 1949 by Montreal Locomotive Works. The selective application of gold plating places the focus on the early RS-2 road-switcher, which is made all the more visible thanks to the tiger-striped pattern, painted on the front. The rail yard in the engraved background is bustling with activity, and typifies the environment in which these versatile workhorses shine.

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Technology Note - Gold Plating
The Royal Canadian Mint’s proprietary selective gold plating process is the most advanced in the world, resulting in unparalleled precision and beauty.

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Purity Note
In the heart of the northern boreal pine forest, a locomotive engine pulls a railroad train of boxcars and passenger cars over a railway bridge, as pine trees go by. The Royal Canadian Mint refines the purest silver in the world. The RCM is also the only mint in the world to issue commemorative coins in a .9999 fineness. This one troy ounce silver coin is 99.99% pure!

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Obverse
The design by Canadian artist John Mantha looks back at the first wave of diesel-electric locomotives that were introduced in Canada in the 1940s and 1950s. The selective application of gold plating places the focus on the early RS-2 road-switcher, which is made all the more visible thanks to the tiger-striped pattern, painted on the front. The date is also indicated.

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Reverse
A cameo proof portrait of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, in profile facing right, selectively enhanced with 24-karat gold plating. This portrait, the fourth effigy of the queen to appear on Canadian coinage, was executed by the artist Susanna Blunt. The legend ELIZABETH II D. G. REGINA ("Elizabeth II, Queen by the Grace of God") also appears. The denomination is also indicated.

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Packaging
In the heart of the northern boreal pine forest, a locomotive engine pulls a railroad train of boxcars and passenger cars over a railway bridge, as pine trees go by.The coin is encapsulated inside a burgundy leatherette, clamshell-style presentation case, lined with black velvet and protected by a black outer box. An individually-numbered certificate of authenticity is included.

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Specifications
Country Canada
Year of Issue 2017
   
Face Value 20 Dollars
Weight 31.39 g
Diameter 38 mm
Mintage Limit      7,500
   
Finish Proof with 24-Karat Gold Plating
Composition .9999 Fine (Pure) Silver
Edge Reeded (milled, serrated)
   
Artist John Mantha
Certificate Individually Numbered

The Countess of Dufferin
Canadian Pacific Railway Transcontinental The Countess of Dufferin (the engine pictured at the top of this article) was the first steam locomotive to operate in the Canadian prairie provinces and is named after the wife of the first Governor General of Canada. The locomotive was built by M. Baird & Company (builders plate #2660) and delivered to the Northern Pacific Railway as engine #21 in 1872. It was used in the Minnesota and Dakota Territories until 1877 when it was sold for $9700 to Joseph Whitehead, a contractor for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR). The locomotive, along with six flatcars and a caboose, were loaded on to barges at Fisher's Landing, Minnesota and propelled by the SS Selkirk, they were shipped up the Red River to St. Boniface, near Winnipeg, Manitoba, arriving on October 9, 1877.

Upon arrival the locomotive was used on Government of Canada Contract #5, the first contract issued in the promised rail link that brought British Columbia into Confederation. The locomotive was used in the completion of the Pembina branch to the U.S. border, linking Winnipeg with Minneapolis. Next it worked east from Winnipeg to the lakehead in northwest Ontario, connecting with contractors from eastern Canada. In 1883 ownership was transferred and it became Canadian Pacific #151. It then worked west from Winnipeg to Golden, British Columbia where it was last used as a construction locomotive.

In the mid 1880s, the locomotive was again sold, this time to the Columbia River Lumber Company, owned by William Mackenzie and Donald Mann of the Canadian Northern Railway. They renamed the locomotive as The Betsy and used it to power their sawmill. In 1909, the City of Winnipeg learned of the locomotive's existence and convinced the owners to donate it to the city. It was transported back to Winnipeg, restored in the Weston Shop and renumbered CPR #1. It was displayed in various locations until 1977, when Mr. George Richardson and the CPR spent a considerable amount of money to fully restore the Countess of Dufferin. The locomotive now resides in the Winnipeg Railway Museum in Union Station in downtown Winnipeg.

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Gordon Lightfoot's Canadian Railroad Trilogy
The building of the CPR is the subject of a song by the well-known folk-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist Gordon Lightfoot. Canadian Railroad Trilogy is a quintessentially Canadian song by a quintessentially Canadian artist. This song was commissioned by the CBC for a special broadcast on January 1, 1967. It appeared on Lightfoot's The Way I Feel album later in the same year. In the first section, the song picks up speed like a locomotive building up a head of steam.

Logo of the Canadian Pacific RailroadRarely has a single song captured a mood, created an atmosphere, and summed such a momentous occasion as the building of an entire nation so succinctly yet so thoroughly as Canadian Railroad Trilogy. While Lightfoot's song echoes the optimism of the railroad age, it also chronicles the cost in sweat and blood of building "an iron road runnin' from the sea to the sea." According to Lightfoot, Pierre Berton said to him, "You know, Gord, you said as much in that song as I said in my two books." Berton was referring to his pair of volumes about the building of the railway across Canada, The National Dream and The Last Spike.

In 2001, Gordon Lightfoot's Canadian Railroad Trilogy was honored as one of the Canadian MasterWorks by the Audio-Visual Preservation Trust of Canada. The song has been covered by rocker John Mellencamp and country singer George Hamilton IV, among others. Please see below for the full lyrics to this beautiful song.

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Canadian Railroad Trilogy by Gordon Lightfoot
There was a time in this fair land when the railroad did not run
When the wild majestic mountains stood alone against the sun
Long before the white man and long before the wheel
When the green dark forest was too silent to be real
                                      
But time has no beginnings and the history has no bounds
As to this verdant country they came from all around
They sailed upon her waterways and they walked the forests tall
Built the mines, mills and the factories for the good of us all
                                      
And when the young man's fancy was turnin' to the spring
The railroad men grew restless for to hear the hammers ring
Their minds were overflowing with the visions of their day
And many a fortune lost and won and many a debt to pay
                                      
For they looked in the future and what did they see
They saw an iron road running from the sea to the sea
Bringing the goods to a young growing land
All up from the seaports and into their hands
                                      
Look away said they across this mighty land
From the eastern shore to the western strand
                                      
Bring in the workers and bring up the rails
We gotta lay down the tracks and tear up the trails
Open her heart let the life blood flow
Gotta get on our way 'cause we're moving too slow
                                      
Bring in the workers and bring up the rails
We're gonna lay down the tracks and tear up the trails
Open her heart let the life blood flow
Gotta get on our way 'cause we're moving too slow
Get on our way 'cause we're moving too slow
                                      
Behind the blue Rockies the sun is declining
The stars they come stealing at the close of the day
Across the wide prairie our loved ones lie sleeping
Beyond the dark ocean in a place far away
                                      
We are the navvies who work upon the railway
Swinging our hammers in the bright blazing sun
Living on stew and drinking bad whiskey
Bending our backs til the long days are done
                                      
We are the navvies who work upon the railway
Swinging our hammers in the bright blazing sun
Laying down track and building the bridges
Bending our old backs til the railroad is done
                                      
So over the mountains and over the plains
Into the muskeg and into the rain
Up the St. Lawrence all the way to Gaspe
Swinging our hammers and drawing our pay
Layin' 'em in and tying them down
Away to the bunkhouse and into the town
A dollar a day and a place for my head
A drink to the living, a toast to the dead
                                      
Oh the song of the future has been sung
All the battles have been won
On the mountain tops we stand
All the world at our command
We have opened up her soil
With our teardrops and our toil
                                      
For there was a time in this fair land when the railroad did not run
When the wild majestic mountains stood alone against the sun
Long before the white man and long before the wheel
When the green dark forest was too silent to be real
When the green dark forest was too silent to be real
And many are the dead men too silent to be real

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