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Canada 2017 Great Halifax Explosion of 1917 100th Anniversary World War I Ammunition Ships Collision $100 Gold Proof GX L02 - MINTAGE 1,500

Price: $699.95 $489.95
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08149
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Product Description

The annual $100 Gold Proof for 2017 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Great Halifax Explosion of 1917, during the First World War. The extremely low mintage of just 1,500 virtually guarantees a sell-out, just like last year!

Investment Opportunity!It was the largest man-made explosion of the pre-nuclear era. On the morning of December 6, 1917, the Norwegian ship SS Imo and the French ammunition ship SS Mont-Blanc collided as they made their way through Halifax, Nova Scotia’s busy harbor. The impact ignited Mont-Blanc’s explosive cargo, resulting in an catastrophic blast that instantly leveled the entire district, killed almost 2,000 people, and triggered a tsunami. The Royal Canadian Mint’s world-renowned annual $100 Gold Commemorative for 2017 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Halifax Explosion of 1917,  during the dark days of the First World War, by combining two powerfully symbolic elements associated with this maritime disaster: the final view of the munitions ship SS Mont-Blanc at the moment she exploded, sailing westward into history; and the melted face of a clock retrieved from the wreckage, its hands forever frozen at the exact moment of the detonation, 9:04 am. To this day, the Halifax Explosion remains one of the worst North American tragedies of all time.

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Investment Note -Lowest mintage limit ever for this series - only 1,500! (That's down from 3,000 in 2011!) The $100 Gold Proof Series is highly collected (as are nautical and ship coins), and this year's edition proudly celebrates the Great Halifax Explosion of 1917 during the First World War! Last year's Great Parliament Fire $100 Gold Proof sold out quickly at the Mint! We therefore recommend this as a buy-and-hold investment and predict another fast sell-out!

It was the largest man-made explosion of the pre-nuclear era. On the morning of December 6, 1917, the Norwegian ship SS Imo and the French ammunition ship SS Mont-Blanc collided as they made their way through Halifax, Nova Scotia’s busy harbor. The impact ignited Mont-Blanc’s explosive cargo, resulting in an catastophic blast that instantly leveled the entire district, killed almost 2,000 people, and triggered a tsunami. The Royal Canadian Mint’s world-renowned annual $100 Gold Commemorative for 2017 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Halifax Explosion of 1917, during the dark days of the First World War, by combining two powerfully symbolic elements associated with this maritime disaster: the final view of the munitions ship SS Mont-Blanc at the moment she exploded, sailing westward into history; and the melted face of a clock retrieved from the wreckage, its hands forever frozen at the exact moment of the detonation, 9:04 am. To this day, the Halifax Explosion remains one of the worst North Ameircan tragedies of all time.The Great Halifax Explosion of 1917
The Halifax Explosion was a maritime disaster in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, on the morning of 6 December 1917. SS Mont-Blanc, a French cargo ship laden with high explosives, collided with the Norwegian vessel SS Imo in the Narrows, a strait connecting the upper Halifax Harbour to Bedford Basin. A fire on board the French ship ignited her cargo, causing a large explosion that devastated the Richmond district of Halifax. Approximately 2,000 people were killed by blast, debris, fires and collapsed buildings, and an estimated 9,000 others were injured.

The blast was the largest man-made explosion prior to the development of nuclear weapons, releasing the equivalent energy of roughly 2.9 kilotons of TNT. Temperatures of 5,000 °C (9,030 °F) and pressures of thousands of atmospheres accompanied the moment of detonation at the center of the explosion. White-hot shards of iron fell down upon Halifax and Dartmouth, starting hundreds of fires, where entire city blocks were caught up in the inferno, trapping residents inside their houses. Firefighter Billy Wells, who was thrown away from the explosion and had his clothes torn from his body, described the devastation survivors faced: "The sight was awful, with people hanging out of windows dead. Some with their heads missing, and some thrown onto the overhead telegraph wires.".

Mont-Blanc
's forward 90 mm gun, its barrel melted away, landed approximately 3.5 miles north of the explosion site in Dartmouth, while the shank of her anchor, weighing half a ton, landed 2 miles south at Armdale.

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It was the largest man-made explosion of the pre-nuclear era. On the morning of December 6, 1917, the Norwegian ship SS Imo and the French ammunition ship SS Mont-Blanc collided as they made their way through Halifax, Nova Scotia’s busy harbor. The impact ignited Mont-Blanc’s explosive cargo, resulting in an catastophic blast that instantly leveled the entire district, killed almost 2,000 people, and triggered a tsunami. The Royal Canadian Mint’s world-renowned annual $100 Gold Commemorative for 2017 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Halifax Explosion of 1917, during the dark days of the First World War, by combining two powerfully symbolic elements associated with this maritime disaster: the final view of the munitions ship SS Mont-Blanc at the moment she exploded, sailing westward into history; and the melted face of a clock retrieved from the wreckage, its hands forever frozen at the exact moment of the detonation, 9:04 am. To this day, the Halifax Explosion remains one of the worst North Ameircan tragedies of all time.Nearly all structures within a half mile radius, including the entire community of Richmond, were obliterated. A pressure wave snapped trees, bent iron rails, demolished buildings, grounded vessels, and scattered fragments of Mont-Blanc for kilometers. Hundreds of people who had been watching the fire from their homes were blinded when the blast wave shattered the windows in front of them, while over 5,000 more suffered some form of eye injury. Hardly a window in the city proper survived the blast. Across the harbor in Dartmouth, there was also widespread damage. A tsunami created by the blast wiped out the community of Mi'kmaq tribe Native American people who had lived in the Tuft's Cove area for generations.

Authorities in Boston, Massachusetts, learned of the disaster by telegraph. They quickly organized and dispatched a relief train around 10 pm on December 6th to assist survivors. A blizzard delayed the train, which finally arrived in the early morning of December 8, and immediately began distributing food, water, and medical supplies. Numerous personnel on the train were able to relieve the Nova Scotia medical staff, most of whom had worked around the clock without rest since the explosion occurred. Nova Scotian children study the explosion in school. They know "Boston was one of the first responders, and really a lifesaver."

In commemoration of Boston's relief assistance, the province of Nova Scotia sends a large pine tree to Boston every year. This tree is the official Boston Chistmas Tree, lit in a ceremony on the Boston Common throughout the Christmas season.The tree arrives in Boston under police escort.[16] In the same way that schoolchildren see the tree off in Nova Scotia, schoolchildren from Boston are on hand to welcome it to the Boston Common.

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Click here for more Canadian annual $100 gold proofs!


It was the largest man-made explosion of the pre-nuclear era. On the morning of December 6, 1917, the Norwegian ship SS Imo and the French ammunition ship SS Mont-Blanc collided as they made their way through Halifax, Nova Scotia’s busy harbor. The impact ignited Mont-Blanc’s explosive cargo, resulting in an catastophic blast that instantly leveled the entire district, killed almost 2,000 people, and triggered a tsunami. The Royal Canadian Mint’s world-renowned annual $100 Gold Commemorative for 2017 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Halifax Explosion of 1917, during the dark days of the First World War, by combining two powerfully symbolic elements associated with this maritime disaster: the final view of the munitions ship SS Mont-Blanc at the moment she exploded, sailing westward into history; and the melted face of a clock retrieved from the wreckage, its hands forever frozen at the exact moment of the detonation, 9:04 am. To this day, the Halifax Explosion remains one of the worst North Ameircan tragedies of all time.An Intricate, Highly Detailed Design!
The design by Canadian artist Canadian artist Jamie Desrochers brings together two symbolic elements that are synonymous with the Halifax Explosion of 1917: the ammunition ship SS Mont-Blanc, whose cargo was the source of the tragic explosion; and an explosion-damaged clock that was retrieved from the rubble. In the foreground is a partial port side view of SS Mont-Blanc—specifically her stern, which was struck by SS Imo on the morning of December 6, 1917. Intricate engraving presents an outstanding amount of detail, including the ship’s mast and railing. Multiple finishes enhance the engraved clock’s appearance while conveying the extent of the damage: the metal is beaten, warped and twisted; its face, hands and numbers have melted from the intense heat, yet they still retained their form. The clock stands as a permanent reminder, an instant frozen in time, its hands forever marking the moment of the explosion: 9:04 a.m.

The intricate and elegant design is finely engraved and meticulously presented in beautiful proof finish (frosted cameo raised elements (devices) on a mirrored background or field), a testament to the exceptional talents of the designer and unparalleled RCM craftsmanship and technology.

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Investment Note
Again this year the mintage limit of the annual $100 Gold Proof remains reduced, from 3,000 in 2011 to only 1,500! In 2007, the mintage limit was nearly slashed in half, being reduced from 9,000 to only 5,000. In 2011, the mintage was reduced again, from 5,000 to only 3,000, and the 2011 Railroad $100 Gold Proof naturally sold out. In 2012, the mintage as slashed again, from 3,000 to 2,500, and the 2012 Cariboo Gold Rush $100 Gold Proof likewise sold out at the Mint! Once again, this is a very small mintage indeed for this ever-popular and affordable series, so the 2017 entry in this 30-plus-year-old program seems like a sure sell-out, too!

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Obverse
2017 Canada Gold Halifax Explosion $100 in display boxThe design by Canadian artist Canadian artist Jamie Desrochers brings together two symbolic elements that are synonymous with the Halifax Explosion of 1917: the ammunition ship SS Mont-Blanc, whose cargo was the source of the tragic explosion; and an explosion-damaged clock that was retrieved from the rubble. The dual dates 1917-2017 mark the anniversary. The denomination is also indicated.

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Reverse
Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, in profile facing right. This portrait, the fourth effigy of the queen to appear on Canadian coinage, was executed by the artist Susanna Blunt. The legend ELIZABETH II D. G. REGINA ("Elizabeth II, Queen by the Grace of God") also appears.

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Packaging

The coin is encapsulated inside a burgundy leatherette, clamshell-style presentation case, lined with black velvet and protected by a black outer box. An individually-numbered certificate of authenticity is included.

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Specifications
Country Canada
Year of Issue 2017
   
Face Value 100 Dollars
Weight 12.00 g
Diameter 27.00 mm
Mintage Limit        1,500
   
Finish Proof
Composition .5833 Fine (14-Karat) Gold alloyed with .4167 Fine Silver
Edge Serrated (milled, reeded)
   
Artist Jamie Desrochers
Certificate Individually Numbered

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